Archive for the ‘US Politics’ Category

Jocurile Olimpice 2016 – Chicago or Rio?

October 2, 2009

 

Nu a fost sa fie, ne vedem in 2016 in RIO!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://www.cnn.com

Obama makes 2016 Olympics sales pitch for Chicago

Obama

 

“Chicago is a place where we strive to celebrate what makes us different, just as we celebrate what we have in common,” Obama said.

He pointed out that from hosting the World’s Fair in 1893 to hosting World Cup events in 1994, the Illinois city has the experience needed to put on an Olympic Games.

“We know how to put on big events and scores of visitors and spectators will tell you we do it well,” the president said.

“Chicago’s vision for the Olympic and Paralympic movement is about so much more than what we can offer the Games,” she said. “It’s about what the Games can offer all of us. It’s about inspiring this generation and building a lasting legacy for the next.

It’s about our responsibility as Americans not just to put on great Games, but to use these Games as a vehicle to bring us together, to usher in a new era of international engagement, and to give us hope and to change lives all over the world,” she said.

Obama said Chicago is a place where people know that no matter their background, “with hard work and discipline and dedication, we can make it if we try.”

He said, “That’s not just the American dream, that is the Olympic spirit. That’s why we see so much of ourselves in these Games. And that’s why we want them in Chicago. That’s why we want them in America.”

“One of the legacies I want to see coming out of the Chicago 2016 hosting of the Games is a reminder that America at its best is open to the world,” he said. “We are putting the full force of the White House and the State Department to make sure that not only is this a successful Games, but that visitors from around the world feel welcome and will come away with a sense of the incredible diversity of the American people.”

 

Michelle Obama steals the show in Copenhagen

www.cnn.com

 

Michelle

 

First lady talks about her roots on Chicago’s South Side, father’s battle with MS

“I am dreaming of an Olympic and Paralympic Games in Chicago,” she said

International Olympic Committee will announce winner after 12:30 p.m. ET.

“Sports were a gift I shared with my dad, especially the Olympic Games,” Obama said in her portion of the U.S. delegation’s final presentation to the International Olympic Committee. “Some of my best memories are sitting on my dad’s lap, cheering on Olga and Nadia, Carl Lewis and others for their brilliance and perfection.

“But I never dreamed that the Olympic flame might one day light up lives in my neighborhood,” she said. “But today, I can dream, and I am dreaming of an Olympic and Paralympic Games in Chicago that will light up lives in neighborhoods all across America and all across the world.”

The mention of the Paralympic Games was significant because a good bit of Obama’s speech tugged at the heartstrings by focusing on how her father was diagnosed with MS in his early 30s, leaving him nearly unable to walk. She spoke in a halting voice about how he kept getting sicker but still taught her how to play sports while propping himself up on crutches.

“My dad was my hero. And when I think of what these games could mean to people all over the world, I think of people like my dad, who face seemingly insurmountable challenges, but they never give up.”

“I think Chicago could not have made a better presentation. Now it’s up to the IOC,” President Obama said. “Only thing I’m upset about is I followed Michelle, which is never good.”

‘I’m leaving with the same set of values’ – President Bush

November 28, 2008

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Q How do you want to be remembered, and what are you most proud of?

THE PRESIDENT: I would like to be a person remembered as a person who, first and foremost, did not sell his soul in order to accommodate the political process. I came to Washington with a set of values, and I’m leaving with the same set of values. And I darn sure wasn’t going to sacrifice those values; that I was a President that had to make tough choices and was willing to make them. I surrounded myself with good people. I carefully considered the advice of smart, capable people and made tough decisions. I’d like to be a President (known) as somebody who liberated 50 million people and helped achieve peace; that focused on individuals rather than process; that rallied people to serve their neighbor; that led an effort to help relieve HIV/AIDS and malaria on places like the continent of Africa; that helped elderly people get prescription drugs and Medicare as a part of the basic package; that came to Washington, D.C., with a set of political statements and worked as hard as I possibly could to do what I told the American people I would do.

 

Q Laura, you have done so much for women and

children around the world. What’s been your most rewarding

initiative?

MRS. BUSH: they can

be educated quickly, because they missed their Well, it’s certainly been very rewarding to look at Afghanistan and both know that the President and

the United States military liberated women there; that women and girls can be in school now; that women can walk outside their doors without a male escort.  worry about Afghanistan, but I will always have a special place in my heart for the women that I’ve met there, both on my visits to Afghanistan and then the many women from Afghanistan who’ve traveled to the United States on scholarships or with the Afghan American Women’s Council, or with a lot of other ways that American citizens have opened their homes to women in Afghanistan so education when they were children or young women, because they weren’t allowed to learn anything. I think that’s really important. I think as we look all around the Middle East, we’ll see that women can be the ones who really lead the freedom movement, and that American women are standing so strongly, I think, with the women in Afghanistan and other places.

 

Q Mr. President, one of your education initiatives is the No Child Left Behind. Can you reflect on that a little bit?

THE PRESIDENT: I think the No Child Left Behind Act is one of the significant achievements of my Administration because we said loud and clear to educators, parents, and children that we expect the best for every child, that we believe every child can learn, and that in return for Federal money we expect there to be an accountability system in place to determine whether every child is

learning to read, write, and add and subtract. This is a piece of legislation that required both Republicans and Democrats coming together, and it is a landmark legislative achievement. But more importantly, it focused the country’s attention on the fact that we had an achievement gap that — you know, white kids were reading better in the 4th grade than Latinos or African American kids. And that’s unacceptable for America. And the No Child Left Behind Act started holding people to account, and the achievement gap is narrowing. When you couple that with a very strong literacy initiative, which Laura has been a part of, it begins to focus our whole system on solving problems early, and not accepting this premise that you’re just going to move people through the system and hope for the best, and insisting upon high standards for every single child. And I’m very proud of that accomplishment, and I appreciate all those here in Washington and around the country that have worked hard to see that the promise of No Child Left Behind has been fulfilled.

 

Q Can you describe the influence our parents had on you?

THE PRESIDENT: I think that the gift our dad gave to all of us is unconditional love. It is the greatest gift a father can give a child. And it has made life so much easier in many ways, because if you have the ultimate gift of love, then the difficulties of life can be easier handled. And to me that is a great gift. And he also taught me — and I think you and Jeb and Neil and Marvin — that you can go into politics with a set of values and you don’t have to sell your soul once you’re in the political system. And you can come out with the same set of values. And so I remember, I think it was Jeb said, “Dad was busy in politics, but he invented the definition of quality time.” In other words, he was a great father before politics, a great father during politics and a great father after politics.

 

Q What role does faith play in your day-to-day life?

THE PRESIDENT: I’ve been in the Bible every day since I’ve been the President, and I have been affected by people’s prayers a lot. I have found that faith is comforting, faith is strengthening, faith has been important….I would advise politicians, however, to be careful  about faith in the public arena. …In other words, politicians should not be judgmental people based upon their faith. They should recognize — as least I have recognized I am a lowly sinner seeking redemption, and therefore have been very careful about saying (accept) my faith or you’re bad. In other words, if you don’t accept what I believe, you’re a bad person. And the greatness of America — it really is – is that you can worship or not worship and be equally American. And it doesn’t matter how you choose to worship; you’re equally American. And it’s very important for any President to jealously protect, guard, and strengthen that freedom.

Obama: budget reform “a necessity”

November 25, 2008

obama11

www.cnn.com

(CNN) — President-elect Barack Obama pledged Tuesday to go through the federal budget “page by page, line by line” to eliminate excessive spending and get the economy back on track.

If we are going to make the investments we need, we also have to be willing to shed the spending that we don’t need,” Obama said at a news conference in Chicago, Illinois.

In these challenging times, when we’re facing both rising deficits and a sinking economy, budget reform is not an option. It’s a necessity,” he said.

Obama also said that he has selected Peter Orszag as his nominee for director of the Office of Management and Budget.

Orszag, the head of the Congressional Budget Office, is an expert on health care, pensions and Social Security policy. He worked at the Clinton White House as special assistant to the president at the National Economic Council and served on the Council of Economic Advisers.

Those named to Obama’s economic team already have started working on crafting an economic recovery plan. The group also must figure out how best to allocate the rest of the $700 billion bailout that Congress passed in October.

Obama has said he hopes the new Congress will begin work on an aggressive economic recovery plan when it convenes in January so his administration can immediately get to work. The president-elect said Tuesday that it is important that his administration not “stumble” into office but “hit the ground running.

An economic stimulus package is central to Obama’s plan. Obama on Monday declined to speculate how big the stimulus would need to be, saying, “We are going to do what’s required to jolt this economy back into shape.”

Estimates for how much might be spent on a multiple-year stimulus package range as high as $500 billion to $700 billion. At the center of the plan are investments in the nation’s roads, bridges, schools and alternative-energy infrastructure. Obama has said his plan will lead to the creation of 2.5 million jobs.

The president-elect insisted Tuesday that his proposed stimulus would not be “more of the same” when it comes to Washington spending.

This isn’t about big government or small government. It’s about building a smarter government that focuses on what works. That’s why I will ask my new team to think anew and act anew to meet our new challenges,” Obama said.

Despite the problems facing his administration, Obama said he is “confident that we are going to rise to meet this challenge” if everyone works together.

In order for us to be effective, given the scope and the scale of the challenges that we face, Republicans and Democrats are going to have to work together,” he said.

Renowned economic pessimist Nouriel Roubini approves of Obama’s picks

November 25, 2008

obama1

http://www.newsweek.com/id/170712

By Daniel Stone | Newsweek Web Exclusive, Nov 24, 2008 

“Infamously pessimistic economist Nouriel Roubini, a professor at New York University, spoke to NEWSWEEK’s Daniel Stone about what wise decisions must be made early on, his thoughts on Obama’s economic team, and how they can they stop the bleeding. Excerpts:

NEWSWEEK: What are your thoughts on the team Obama assembled?


Nouriel Roubini:
The choices are excellent. Tim Geithner is going to be a pragmatic, thoughtful and great leader for the Treasury. He has experience at the Treasury and the IMF [International Monetary Fund], then the New York Fed. I have great respect for both Geithner as well as Larry Summers. I think both of them in top roles in economics in the administration were good moves. I think very highly of them both.

What are the first things they need to tackle?


First one is the fiscal stimulus, because the troubled economy is in a freefall, so we really need to boost aggregate demand, and the sooner and larger the better. The second thing they should do is recapitalize the financial system. Most of the $700 billion is going to be used to recapitalize banks, broker dealers, finance companies and insurance companies. To do it aggressively and fast is going to be important.

The plan Obama has talked about includes spending on infrastructure and energy development to create jobs. How likely is that to produce long-term aid to the economy?
We need to do it because demand and spending and housing are literally collapsing. That will get a boost from public-sector spending: [spending on] infrastructure, unemployment benefits, state and local government aid, more food stamps. We’re going to have to think larger, but I don’t think you can pass most of it until January when [Obama] comes to power. We’re going to have to wait, because nothing seems possible for the time being. But I expect most of his plans will pass once the new administration is in power.

Obama is largely powerless for the next two months. What’s your outlook from now through January? 
The lame-duck session of Congress really needs to spend on unemployment benefits, aid to save the local governments and on food stamps. Those things are very short-run and are very important. It’s really the most we can do for now.

Your view of the economic future is often a bit less than optimistic. What does Obama’s team signal about what could be coming?


Look, he wants to get things done, so he’s choosing a really terrific team. To me, it says that he’s choosing people who have great experience. He’s choosing people who are pragmatic and who realize the severity of the national problem we’re facing. They’re knowledgeable about markets, about the economy and the political process in Washington. These are the very best people he could have chosen. I can’t look too far, but it’s a very good signal of what he wants to do.”